Outreach

Research is most beneficial to management and conservation when results are presented to, and understood by, stakeholders that use and enjoy the natural resources being studied.  To that end, I actively disseminate results of my research, and the research of my peers, to other scientists, resource managers, anglers, and the general public.  I encourage anyone browsing this page to follow along and participate in my social media outreach and citizen science efforts!

 

Social Media

  • AFS Black Bass Conservation Committee Facebook Page:  As social media director, I create and share content on black bass management and conservation of black bass diversity.  Specifically, my goals for this outreach effort are educating anglers and the general public on 1) the diversity of black bass and the species endemic to the southeastern U.S.; 2) the dangers associated with stocking fish outside of their native basins; and 3) the importance of conserving intact aquatic habitats for native biodiversity.  The page has about 900 followers and posts regularly reach 200 – 1,000 people, facilitating conversations between scientists, managers, and anglers.  My “What’s That Bass Wednesday” posts have been a popular way of demonstrating the diversity of black bass species and the threat that hybridization with non-native species poses.

 

  • Native Bass Blog:  This is a personal blog I created to explore topics related to one of my favorite research subjects and angling targets – the black basses!  I highlight research findings, answer questions, chronicle my research efforts and angling adventures, and explore other related topics.  My goal with this blog is to present material applicable to anglers and the general public in a concise and understandable format.

 

Citizen Science

  • iNaturalist Group, Angling for Black Bass Conservation:  This group is a place where anglers can upload geo-tagged photographs of black bass to help inform conservation of native species (e.g., Shoal Bass, Chattahoochee Bass, Bartram’s Bass).  Leveraging my presence on social media outlets and incentivizing angler participation should help expand these efforts, with the goal of creating a robust, angler-contributed dataset that can ultimately be used to inform conservation efforts.

 

In The News (interviews and articles)

 

Writing and Editing

 

Presentations

Invited Platform Presentations
  • Taylor, A.T., M.D. Tringali, and J.M. Long. 2017. “A collaborative, range-wide genetic structure survey to inform management and conservation of the Shoal Bass.” Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Tampa, FL. Black Bass Diversity Symposium.
  • Taylor, A.T., M. Papeş, and J.M. Long. 2017. “Informing conservation of fluvial black bass species with range-wide species distribution models.” Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Tampa, FL. Black Bass Diversity Symposium.
  • Tringali, M.D., S.M. Sammons, J.M. Long, N. Van Bibber, K. Panzner, and A.T. Taylor. 2017. “A range-wide threat assessment for Shoal Bass from introgressive hybridization.” Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Tampa, FL. Black Bass Diversity Symposium.
  • O’Rouke, P., S.M. Sammons, and A.T. Taylor. 2017. “Sampling challenges and strategies for Shoal Bass management in Georgia.” Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Tampa, FL. Black Bass Diversity Symposium.
  • Taylor, A.T., and J.M. Long. 2016. “Using species distribution models to infer potential and restricted ranges of a fluvial-specialist black bass species.” Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Kansas City, MO. Managing Centrarchid Fisheries in Rivers and Streams Symposium.
  • Holley, C.T., A.T. Taylor, and J.M. Long. 2016. “Resample, recapture, and re-analyze: using the 3 R’s to resurrect the scale method of estimating fish age.” Annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Kansas City, MO. Managing Centrarchid Fisheries in Rivers and Streams Symposium.
  • Taylor, A.T., J.M. Long, M.D. Tringali, M.R. Schwemm, and S.K. Brewer. 2016. “Introgression and population structure of Neosho Smallmouth Bass.” Coordinating committee meeting of the Oklahoma Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit held in Stillwater, OK.
  • Taylor, A.T., and D. L. Peterson. 2012. “Shoal Bass between lakes Blackshear and Worth: a population status assessment.” Shoal Bass Saturday event organized by The Flint Riverkeeper, Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Southeast Watershed Forum, and Wild Rivers held in Perry, GA.
  • Taylor, A.T. 2010. “The Shoal Bass: biology, threats, and research direction.” Meeting of the Flint River Chapter of Trout Unlimited held in Senoia, GA.
Contributed Platform Presentations
  • Taylor, A.T., J.M. Long, M.R. Schwemm, and S.K. Brewer. 2018. “A genetic status assessment of the Neosho Smallmouth Bass: hybridization, diversity, and population structure.” Annual meeting of the Oklahoma Natural Resources Conference held in Tulsa, OK.
  • Taylor, A.T., M.D. Tringali, and J.M. Long. 2017. “Shoal Bass hybridization in the Chattahoochee River below Morgan Falls Dam, Georgia.” Annual meeting of the Southeastern Fish and Wildlife Agencies held in Louisville, KY.
  • Holley, C.T., A.T. Taylor, and J.M. Long. 2017. “Resample, recapture, and re-analyze: using the 3 R’s to resurrect the scale method of estimating fish age.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Oklahoma City, OK.
  • Taylor, A.T., J.M. Long, M.D. Tringali, M.R. Schwemm, and S.K. Brewer. 2016. “Introgression and population structure of Neosho Smallmouth Bass.” Oklahoma Natural Resources Conference held in Oklahoma City, OK.
  • Taylor, A.T., and J.M. Long. 2016. “The decline of a fluvial fish: species distribution models in a fragmented riverscape.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Wheeling, WV.
  • Taylor, A.T., and J.M. Long. 2015. “Factors influencing the decline of fluvial fishes: insights from historic and current species distribution models.” Annual Student Water Conference held in Stillwater, OK.
  • Taylor, A.T., M.D. Tringali, S.M. Sammons, D.L. Peterson, T. Ingram, P. O’Rouke, and J.M. Long. 2015. “Genetic substructure within the native range of the Shoal Bass.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Savannah, GA.
  • Taylor, A.T., P. O’Rouke, and J.M. Long. 2014. “Black Bass (genus Micropterus) community composition upstream of impoundment in two southeastern rivers.” Annual meeting of the Georgia Chapter of the American Fisheries Society held in Athens, GA.
  • Taylor, A.T., P. O’Rouke, and J.M. Long. 2014. “Black Bass (genus Micropterus) community composition in the river- reservoir interface of two southeastern rivers.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Charleston, SC.
  • Taylor, A.T., and D.L. Peterson. 2013. “Post-tournament movement and fate of Shoal Bass translocated from the lower Flint River into Lake Worth, Georgia.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Nashville, TN. Black Bass Diversity Symposium: Multidisciplinary Science for Conservation.
  • Freeman, B.J., A.T. Taylor, K. Oswald, M. Freeman, J. Quattro, and J. Leitner. 2013. “Shoal Basses, a clade of cryptic identity.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Nashville, TN. Black Bass Diversity Symposium: Multidisciplinary Science for Conservation.
  • Taylor, A.T., and D.L. Peterson. 2012. “Shoal Bass tag retention and spawning aggregation abundance in the lower Flint River, GA.” Annual meeting of the Georgia Chapter of the American Fisheries Society held in Macon, GA. Awarded second place student presentation.
  • Taylor, A.T., and D.L. Peterson. 2012. “Shoal Bass tag retention and spawning aggregation abundance in the lower Flint River, GA.” Annual Meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Biloxi, MS.
  • Taylor, A.T., and D.L. Peterson. 2010. “Population dynamics and seasonal habitat use of Shoal Bass in the Chattahoochee River, Georgia.” Annual Warnell Graduate Student Symposium held in Athens, GA. Awarded second place in session.
  • Freeman, B.J., and A.T. Taylor. 2009. “Taxonomy of the Redeye Bass complex.” Annual meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society held in Nashville, TN. 

Poster Presentations

  • Taylor, A.T., and J.M. Long. 2018. “Genetic integrity and population status of Shoal Bass in the upper Chattahoochee River Basin, Georgia.” Biennial Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit National Network Meeting held in Shepherdstown, WV. Invited presentation.
  • Holley, C.T., X. Feng, M. Papes, A.T. Taylor, and J.M. Long. 2017. Range-wide ecological niche model for the state-endangered Longnose Darter. Annual Oklahoma Natural Resources Conference held in Tulsa, OK.
  • Taylor, A.T., and D.L. Peterson. 2010. “Potential for establishment of non-native Smallmouth Bass in the Chattahoochee River.” Annual meeting of the Southeastern Fishes Council held in Athens, GA. Awarded third place student poster.